Employment Law Attorney

Our firm is dedicated to representing employees as individuals or as class representatives against their employers for Labor law violations, including:
Overtime, Double Time, Failure to Provide Meal and Rest, Unpaid Tips, Unpaid wages, Improper Employee Classification, Failure to Reimburse Business Expenses , Failure to Provide Commissions, Unlawful Deductions, Failure to Provide Accurate Wage Statements, Failure to Pay all Wages at the time of Discharge or Resignation. We have recovered millions of dollars in unpaid wages and penalties for our clients. Contact us for a free consultation today.

OVERTIME & DOUBLE-TIME

In California, the general overtime provisions are that a nonexempt employee shall not be employed more than eight hours in any workday or more than 40 hours in any workweek unless he or she receives one and one-half times his or her regular rate of pay for all hours worked over eight hours in any workday and over 40 hours in the workweek. Eight hours of labor constitutes a day’s work, and employment beyond eight hours in any workday or more than six days in any workweek is permissible provided the employee is compensated for the overtime at not less than:

1.One and one-half times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of eight hours up to and including 12 hours in any workday, and for the first eight hours worked on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek

2.Double the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 12 hours in any workday and for all hours worked in excess of eight on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek.

MEAL PERIOD

In California, an employer may not employ an employee for a work period of more than five hours per day without providing the employee with a meal period of not less than thirty minutes, except that if the total work period per day of the employee is no more than six hours.

A second meal period of not less than thirty minutes is required if an employee works more than ten hours per day, except that if the total hours worked is no more than 12 hours.Unless the employee is relieved of all duty during his or her thirty minute meal period, the meal period shall be considered an “on duty” meal period that is counted as hours worked which must be compensated at the employee’s regular rate of pay.
If the employer requires the employee to remain at the work site or facility during the meal period, the meal period must be paid. This is true even where the employee is relieved of all work duties during the meal period. Bono Enterprises, In. v. Bradshaw (1995) 32 Cal.App.4th 968.
If an employer fails to provide an employee a meal period the employer must pay one additional hour of pay at the employee’s regular rate of pay for each workday that the meal period is not provided.

UNPAID TIPS & BUSINESS EXPENSES

Unpaid Tips

An employer cannot collect, take, or receive any gratuity or part thereof given or left for an employee, or deduct any amount from wages due an employee on account of a gratuity given or left for an employee. Labor Code Section 351 However, a restaurant may have a policy allowing for tip pooling/sharing among employees who provide direct table service to customers.

Business Expenses

An employee is entitled to be reimbursed by his or her employer for all expenses or losses incurred in the direct consequence of the discharge of the employees work duties. Labor Code Section 2802

REST

In California the law states that employers must authorize and permit nonexempt employees to take a rest period that must, insofar as practicable, be taken in the middle of each work period. The rest period is based on the total hours worked daily and must be at the minimum rate of a net ten consecutive minutes for each four hour work period, or major fraction thereof.
A rest period is not required for employees whose total daily work time is less than three and one-half hours. The rest period is counted as time worked and therefore, the employer must pay for such periods. Since employees are paid for their rest periods, they can be required to remain on the employer’s premises during such periods.

The information is not intended to be used for legal advice, and should not be used in determining liability or damages.